News from Tennessee Urban Forestry Council PREVIOUS ISSUE • OCT 2017
Replant Gatlinburg
Please donate for trees!

Tennessee Urban Forestry Council and partners are helping replace trees lost in Gatlinburg’s catastrophic fire last year. We’ll be giving away container-grown trees for private and public lands at a Gatlinburg city park in October 2018. Help us raise $20,000 — buy a book, give a tree, start a grove today! MORE

Donate $125 starts a grove $50 gives a tree
BUY A BOOK Every sale includes $15 donation. MORE
PARTNERS
gatlinburg recreation
Hawkins Partners
NCC
Tennessee Division of Forestry
TACEE

Thank you, TUFC volunteers!

TUFC volunteers contributed 2,719 hours spent on TUFC and urban forestry from October 2016 to September 2017. Give yourself a pat on the back!

Magazine features TUFC arboreta

conservationist

The September/October issue of The Tennessee Conservationist features several arboreta certified by TUFC. MORE

Dyersburg's Okeena Park now a Level 2

Okeena Park

Okeena Park, a Level 1 since 2005, is now certified as a Level 2 arboretum with 69 trees. The 10-acre public park features a one-mile walking trail through an old-growth forest. MORE

White House Arboretum recertified as Level 4

An arboretum since 2013, it has been recertified as Level 4 with 340 trees, 160 types, 144 species, 82 genera, and five species of bamboo. MORE

White House

In addition, Ardinna Woods, Cleveland State, Reflection Riding, and Tusculum College have been added to the arboreta gallery. MORE

PBS show profiles Tusculum's Old Oak

tusculum

Tennessee's Wild Side featured the Old Oak of Tusculum College, a member of TUFC's Landmark Tree Registry. The episode aired on Cookeville, Knoxville, Memphis, and Nashville PBS stations in September. WATCH

New tree sanctuary in Cookeville

Sanctuary

TUFC's newest tree sanctuary is Ed and Suzanne Buck Tree Sanctuary in Cookeville. The residential arboretum program has certified 11 properties. SLIDESHOW

In addition, an anonymous sanctuary in White House has been certified with 21 trees.

David Smith wins photo contest

Contest winner

Somerville's David Smith won American Grove's Great American Tree Photo Contest with his photo of a softshell hickory. Smith donated half his first-place prize money to TUFC. A photo of a Tennessee white oak won third place. WINNERS

West chapter meets October 19

TUFC West chapter's next meeting is October 19. MORE

UFA Course

The West Tennessee Chapter of TUFC  and Memphis Botanic Garden sponsored the September Urban Forestry Advisor course on issues facing the urban tree canopy. Instructors included Eric Bridges, Wes Hopper, Jim Volgas, Shawn Posey, and Joellen Dimond.

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Card gets free money for TUFC

kroger

Raise money for TUFC every time you use your Kroger Plus shopper's card.

Kroger donated more than $40 to TUFC last quarter, earned by seven families using their Kroger Plus shopper's cards.

Get a card or link your current card to Tennessee Urban Forestry Council NPO#84450 by setting up a digital account here or call 1-800-576-4377, option 3. Remember to relink your Kroger card to TUFC every August.

$15 of every sale goes to TUFC's Replant Gatlinburg project

‘Trees of Tennessee’ features landmark, notable trees

  • Hardcover with 128 full-color pages
  • Introduction by TUFC co-founder Gene Hyde
  • More than 150 images including 68 notable, champion, landmark, historic, and heritage trees
  • East, Middle, West Tennessee sections
  • Fascinating facts about notable tree species
  • Legends and tales of landmark and historic trees
  • Proceeds to benefit TUFC programs for healthy and sustainable urban and community forests in Tennessee
Book Cover

$40

FREE
SHIPPING!

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Promoting healthy and sustainable urban and community forests
in Tennessee

New, renewing TUFC members

TREE SANCTUARY
Dolores Hurst
Ed and Suzanne Buck
DONATION
David Smith

Sanctuary

Make your home a tree sanctuary

You can now designate your property as a tree sanctuary with TUFC’s new program for residences. MORE

Emerald ash borer update

EAB
  • 59 counties including Davidson are now under state/federal quarantine. Map
  • EAB cannot be contained, and all ash species are at risk of dying.
  • Significant trees can sometimes be saved with permanent chemical treatments, if diagnosed early.
  • The most important way to slow the spread of EAB is to stop moving firewood.

Tennessee info
National info

Don't Move Firewood

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